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American Ginseng Linked to Improved Memory

  • October 27, 2015

Laboratory studies have long pointed to the benefits of American ginseng. The root is thought to have a number of benefits, and a study published in March of 2015 adds one more to the list: improved working memory in middle aged adults.

Study Reports American Ginseng Improves Memory in Adults

52 healthy individuals between the ages of 40 and 60 were selected for the study, in which subjects were required to take 200mg of American ginseng or a placebo daily. Cognitive performance was monitored after one, three and six hours of taking the supplement. Mood and blood sugar were measured, too.

The researchers found improved working memory after three hours in those who took the American ginseng. Spatial working memory was improved, too. Mood and blood sugar were not affected in a significant way.

“These data confirm that P. quinquefolius [American ginseng] can acutely benefit working memory and extend the age range of this effect to middle-aged individuals. These changes are unlikely to be underpinned by modulation of blood glucose in this population,” the researchers said in a statement.

Click here to read more about the study.

Other Benefits of American Ginseng

Studies like this add to the growing research on the benefits of American ginseng. Laboratory studies have reported it as an immune system and mood booster in younger adults, and it might even have a beneficial effect on inflammatory diseases. Research with American ginseng has focused on a number of conditions.

  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Colds and flu
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Immune system
  • Cognition

How to Incorporate American Ginseng Into Your Diet

Be sure to read the label carefully when shopping for ginseng to be sure you’re getting the kind you want. For American ginseng, look for Panax quinquefolius. Available forms for adults include:

  • Standardized extract
  • Fresh or dried root
  • Tincture (1:5)
  • Fluid extract (1:1)

Source: University of Maryland Medical Center.